A combinatorial explosion is when the configuration settings and user actions and data entered etc. makes it impossible to test everything. The number of tests required to individually test every single possibility is many thousands of times greater than could realistically be tested.

When faced with taking over an existing software applications without a good test suite (or any test plan) often is daunting. And the problems of creating an unfathomable number of tests face you due to combinatorial explosion. Hexawise is a software as a service that aids in dealing with this dilemma for software testers. Software test plans are created that provide far better coverage than is seen in practice with a tiny fraction of the test required for complete combinatorial coverage (that is testing every possible combination [pairwise or 3, 4, 5... way] individually).

The Google Maps test plan provides a good example of combinatorial explosion faced by the testers (in this case, those who tested Google Maps). Take a look at the Google Maps test plan by login to your Hexawise account (creating a demo account is free and simple). The Google Maps test plan is one of 9 samples currently provided in Hexawise.

For creating your own test plan, while you are exploring the software application and testing it out to find "where the weak points are," you will probably find it useful to vary things as much as possible, repeat your actions as little as possible. Those points are true whether you're doing relatively informal lightly documented exploratory testing or more heavily documented test scripts. It addition, since a large percentage of defects can be triggered by the interaction of just two test inputs, it would be nice, if you had time, to test every single possible combination involving two test inputs; that's the rationale behind allpairs, pairwise and orthogonal array-based test case prioritization methods.

To recreate a similar - very early draft - plan for yourself, I'd suggest going through the following steps to put together a relatively small number of highly informative end-to-end-ish tests:

Ask what can change as users go through the system? Think about configuration settings, user actions, data formats, data ranges, etc. even throw in more "creative" ideas like user personas. Let your creativity and common sense guide you. Enter those in as parameters.

Ask how those parameters can change? (for the parameter "Browser" enter IE7, IE8, FF, etc.) Put those in as values under each parameter (entering constraints as required)

Ask does that variation matter? When possible (when it doesn't matter as much) use equivalence classes and be biased towards fewer values - at least for your early draft tests.

Ask what special paths thorough the system do you want to be sure to include? (Most common happy path, paths to trigger certain business rules, etc.)

Click the Create Tests button in Hexawise and you'll instantly get a very nice draft starter set of highly varied tests. If they look like they're relatively interesting and don't miss hugely important things, start informally executing them and you'll be sure to learn some more things as you do about the system's weak points that would result in you going back to those draft tests and iterating them to make them stronger and cover more.

To get a bit more on using this approach see our case studies. Hexawise TV provides narrated videos online showing how to make your life easier as a software tester.

 

Related: Hexawise Tip: Using Value Expansions and Value Pairs to Handle Dependent Values - 3 Strategies to Maximize Effectiveness of Your Tests - Pairwise and Combinatorial Software Testing in Agile Projects

By: John Hunter and Justin Hunter on Jan 2, 2013

Categories: Combinatorial Software Testing, Exploratory Testing, Multi-variate Testing, Pairwise Software Testing, Software Testing, Testing Strategies