We have thousands of users and we're growing by hundreds of new users a month. We don't have a way to accurately breakdown our users into Agile vs Waterfall users but I know from conversations with Hexawise users that many users are using Hexawise with great results on Agile projects.

Agile projects involve short sprints in which new features are added to existing functionality. These sprints are often a couple weeks long. In such situations, it is important to be able to create tests quickly. Hexawise is extremely good at accomplishing exactly that.

Let me explain by way of an example. A Hexawise user named Sandeep asked how Hexawise could be used to create tests for an insurance ratings engine. I was able to create a sample set of 37 2-way tests within 20 minutes.

Now lets imagine that a sprint creates 2 new features that we'd like to test in combination with the existing test inputs in the existing plan. Let's assume "Feature 1" is a new ability of the application to handle input coming in from three sources: (1) web, (2) agent, and (3) call center. Let's assume "Feature 2" is a new ability of the application to handle Group Discounts. The Group Discount parameter will have 3 categories of values as well: (N/A) for people who aren't able to claim them, "Private company," and "Government / Public."

Added the new features, and created another, completely different set of tests that achieve 100% 2-way coverage. Each value in the new feature is tested in at least one test with every other value in the plan. It took less than 4 minutes to create this new set of tests incorporating the new features. It is an extremely attractive benefit of using Hexawise that is excellent for both Waterfall projects (which inevitably have late-breaking requirements changes) as well as Agile projects (where late-breaking feature additions are expected to happen as part of the process).

You want to keep testing documentation light, you want to minimize the amount of time you spend in selecting and documenting tests, and it is helpful to achieve as much coverage in as little time as possible and minimize the risk that you'll accidentally forget to test things that you meant to test (which can be easier to do if you have light test cases with enough detail in them to maximize your odds of testing the important stuff without accidentally omitting tests). Hexawise helps you achieve all of thise objectives. The example shows, as clearly and concisely as I'm able to explain it, how you can use Hexawise to create a small set of powerful tests within four minutes (from 1.7 trillion possible tests) that are well suited to test new features developed in an Agile project iteration.

 

Related: What is Agile? What is not Agile? - Why isn't Software Testing Performed as Efficiently and Effecively as it could be? - Cem Kaner: Testing Checklists = Good / Testing Scripts = Bad?

By: Justin Hunter on Oct 19, 2012

Categories: Agile, Hexawise tips, Pairwise Software Testing, Software Testing