This interview with James Bach is the first our series of “Testing Smarter with…” interviews. Our goal with these interviews is to highlight insights and experiences as told by many of the software testing field’s leading thinkers.

James Bach, one of the most well-known and controversial leaders in the software testing community, challenges himself and others to continually develop their software testing approaches. James believes that excellent testing is a craft that requires many skills and ongoing practice and focus to develop and maintain those skills. The skills of testing include general systems analysis and critical thinking, but also social skills. In some sense, any child can test. But children and other amateurs cannot test systematically, nor can they provide professional self-assessment and reporting on the testing they do.

photo of James Bach
James Bach, Founder and CEO of Satisfice Inc

Personal Background

Hexawise: What one or two software testing-related experiences have you found to be most personally satisfying in your career?

James Bach: In 2002, Microsoft complained to a federal judge that I hadn’t given it a power cord. Yes, an ordinary power cord of the kind you can pull out of the back of any standard desktop computer. Yes, to a federal judge. No, I am not making this up. Yes, I also thought it was bizarre-- bizarre but kind of satisfying.

This happened during the Microsoft Remedies Trial, wherein nine American states were suing Microsoft and the government because they wanted a tougher punishment for Microsoft after it lost its big antitrust case. The states hired me as an expert witness to find out if Microsoft was telling the truth when it claimed it was “technically infeasible” to remove IE and the Windows Media Player. I gathered a team and went to work. I soon discovered that it was possible to remove these things-- using only public information and Microsoft’s own helpful tech support people to set up my testing to prove it. (The tech support people did not realize the purpose of my questions, and cheerily gave me all that I needed to know.)

When I revealed my results, Microsoft demanded that I turn over all the materials necessary to reproduce my results. So I gave them one of my test systems. At the last moment, I pulled out the power cord, thinking that I was causing some low-level techie 30 seconds of annoyance. But the next day Microsoft was in court acting like I had withheld the Golden Power Cord of Truth.

It was satisfying because Microsoft never even attempted to proved me wrong on the facts. They used lawyer tricks to stop my truth bombs, instead. Way to go, Bill Gates.

Another satisfying moment was watching my son find a catastrophic bug in a life-critical piece of medical equipment. He didn’t ask for a spec or a test case specification. He used video-gamer techniques to confuse the system until it overrode its own safety features and melted itself inside the simulated patient. Yeah. Melted. That was a $3000 piece of equipment he ruined. I’ve rarely been prouder of myself for having such foresight as to create a son like him: he is such a good test tool.

people who don’t “embrace exploratory testing” are, to me, not even testers. They are fact checkers, maybe. I think that’s not good enough.

Hexawise: Failures can often lead to interesting lessons learned. Do you have any noteworthy failure stories that you’d be willing to share?

James: How about the time I tried to set up my corporate server. I got it all working. Then I moved it from the conference room to the server room. I couldn’t get it to come online after that. For 12 hours I worked on it, all through the night. At long last I relented to my brother’s suggestion-- that we move it back to the conference room. I had refused to do that because it didn’t make any sense. The conference room simply connected to the server room. How would adding an extraneous variable like that change anything. But, zoom, we were back online.

After a moment of “wha??” the solution flashed into my mind: we must have two feeds to the Internet instead of one. It turned out that the conference room was patched into the open net, but the other port I had been using in the server room was routed through a firewall which in turn connected to the net. Nobody told me this during the buildout of my office space. It was a completely missing possibility in my mind.

So what did I learn? I learned about the importance of de-focusing, which includes trying apparently silly things to solve problems. I’m more open to that now.

Here is another interesting failure. I recently wrote a report involving the calculation of percentages. A non-technical person (a lawyer I worked with) checked my math and found it to be wrong. In fact, every one of her calculations was wrong. But in the process of refuting her claims, I discovered a different error in one of my own numbers. So, isn’t that interesting? Even if a critique of your work is incorrect, it could still be a useful stimulant to help you find your own problems.

Hexawise: What kinds of activities do you enjoy when you’re not at work?

James: I run a business, so I feel like I’m always at work. But I guess I do take little bits of time off each day. What do I do? I daydream. I read science news. I solve math and logic puzzles. I try to walk each day. And I watch videos with my wife. We binge on English television series, mostly.

Hexawise: Describe a testing experience you are especially proud of. What discovery did you make while testing and how did you share this information so improvements could be made to the software?

James: Well, many of those things I now use as testing exercises for my students, so I don’t want to spoil them. But, hmm, here’s one. I was given one day to break into an invoicing system for a large pharmaceutical company. I found three ways to do it. One of the methods I used was to get one of the sales engineers to sit with me while I tested. I asked him to demo the system to me and then he hung around while I tried to break-in. The first time I broke in (using a traversal attack if you follow such things) I didn’t even know I had done it until the sales engineer said “hey you aren’t supposed to see that data.” Good thing he was there, huh? So part of testing can be charming people into helping you, and you never know what that help will bring.

Views on Software Testing

Hexawise: Some of the thought-provoking ideas you and Michael Bolton have come up with, like the important distinction between Testing vs. Checking have received a great deal of attention within the community. Other intellectual contributions to the community you have made are not as well known but are arguably equally important and insightful. One such contribution that comes to mind which really resonates with us at Hexawise is the exploratory-scripted (or formality) continuum you and your brother Jon described.

image of software testing formality continuum

Do you have one or two intellectual contributions to the community that you wish were more widely known?

James: I wish that more people understood the folly, the sheer silliness, of counting test cases and calculating pass rates.

I don’t care if you have 80 test cases or 8 million of them. That number tells me nothing about you or your testing. It tells me nothing by itself, and it tells me nothing in conjuction with other information (except in rare cases not worth talking about). It’s like telling me that you have broken your day into 27 tasks, of 1353 tasks, or whatever. Just stop. Instead of fake science smoke rings, tell me what you actually did. Here’s a simple suggestion: instead of giving me a number, give me a list: a list of test ideas, test cases, test activities, bugs, features, people… I can do something with a list. But if you give me a number I just have to say “show me the things you are counting.”

Hexawise: Can you describe a view or opinion about software testing that you have changed your mind about in the last few years? What caused you to change your mind?

James: I used to think it was useful to talk about exploratory testing. But now I think it’s more helpful to say that all testing is exploratory. To say “exploratory testing” is the same as saying “testing.” Instead, I speak of how testing can be more or less formal, but it is always informal to some degree or else it ceases to be testing.

Also, in the last few years I have concluded that term “test automation” is toxic and should be avoided. It deposits a little poison in the mind whenever it is uttered. An angel loses its wings every time someone calls himself an “automated tester.” I changed my mind on both things as the result of ongoing attempts to teach students and hearing their questions and seeing where they get confused. That, and deep conversations with Michael Bolton.

Hexawise: How do/would you test very complex systems such as genetic algorithm systems and evolutionary systems? How do you test systems when we don't understand how they work? It seems kind of like medical differential diagnosis: poke, observe, learn, hypothesize, poke again. Or is there a better way?

James: I test them using social science methods. That, after all, is how scientists attempt to test their theories about social life. That means an emphasis on qualitative analysis, but bringing in statistical methods whenever applicable.

I agree that the medical world is a good example of where statistical methods and heuristic approaches are also needed. In testing complex things, some of what you need to do includes:

  • You must use time to your advantage-- observing systems over time the way primatologists observe chimps in the wild.
  • You must use Grounded Theory, beginning with immersion and observation, until patterns begin to reveal themselves.
  • You must focus on testability. To create an environment where you can control and observe more of what is there.
  • You must pay attention to clues. Many, many clues. Stop looking for simplistic “test cases” that will “prove” that the software works.
  • You must become expert at data wrangling, since these systems usually involve huge amounts of data.
  • Let other people help you.
  • Forge partnerships with users.

If it’s a training gig then my objective is to show them what testing can be, show them a path to get there, and encourage them to walk that path. A lot of that is about removing the obstacles to moving along.

Hexawise: It is clear from your writings and frequent presentations, that you feel passionately that the software testing community would greatly benefit if far more testers embraced Exploratory Testing. It’s a deeply held conviction. What particular testing practice(s) do you most wish the software testing community would embrace?

James: Testing is exploratory. So, people who don’t “embrace exploratory testing” are, to me, not even testers. They are fact checkers, maybe. I think that’s not good enough.

I wish more testers were mathematically inclined. You must see this, too, at Hexawise-- the widespread math-phobia in our field. I want to talk about Karnaugh maps and the value of de Bruijn sequences. But I have to keep that stuff out of my classes or I will freak most people out. It’s not that I am a mathematics expert. I’m just an enthusiast who wants to be held to a higher standard. But even my dalliances in Bayesian belief nets sound like high elf incantations to most testers. Mathematical disabilities, in general, make our craft prey to quackery and fraud of all kinds.

At the same time, I want to be inclusive. Mathophobes have a lot of offer and I don’t want them to think I don’t welcome them. But must they necessarily be the majority of testers? I guess I’m saying I want a cure for mathophobia, please.

Hexawise: What do you wish more developers, business analysts, and project managers understood about software testing?

James: I wish they understood that it benefits from specialization. When software people get heart disease they don’t limit themselves to a GP, do they? If they need surgery they don’t insist on being operated on by a rotating team of generic medical people who took a three day class in “Agile medicine” do they?

I get to be a specialist tester mainly because I do it on my own time. My clients are paying me, usually, for training, not for doing testing. So I usually test in my “free time” to sharpen my skills. I recently did have a wonderful and lucrative testing-related gig (because this particular project knew that it needed the best tester and analyst it could possibly get and became convinced I was the Chosen One), but those gigs are few and far between for someone like me.

Hexawise: When individual companies hire you for consulting engagements, how would you describe what it is that you usually seek to provide to them?

James: If it’s a training gig then my objective is to show them what testing can be, show them a path to get there, and encourage them to walk that path. A lot of that is about removing the obstacles to moving along. Chief among those obstacles is lack of confidence. So I do a lot of pep talking. Another obstacle is the very primitive, mechanical way that people think about testing. I have to replace that with systems thinking.

If it’s a testing gig then my objective is usually to provide deep, exemplary testing, that is transparent to my client. I want them to feel that they see their product in a beautiful focus. The danger I am always in when I test is that I will get too deep (and therefore be too slow and expensive). But for me, deep testing is the most fun, so it’s a constant struggle to hold myself back from using my most penetrating methods and tools.

Industry Observations / Industry Trends

Hexawise: As Artificial Intelligence increases in capability (for example the strides made by Watson) do you foresee an increase in the capabilities of computer checking? I am thinking, not of an elimination of the difference between human lead testing and what can be done without people but to what extent you see the possibility for AI to do a progressively much better job of checking.

James: I foresee a collapse of critical thinking about these complex systems, followed by some sort of disaster, followed by a new realization of the risks of surrendering human judgment to a machine. I foresee that this will be an ongoing cycle. This collapse of critical thinking will lead to more shallow testing and perfunctory checking, presented as if it were deep. For an example of what I mean, see this old computer commercial:

Pay attention starting at 2:05. Oh look, the computer is assuring us that it has no errors. Everyone relax! Its “electronic brain” can be trusted!

Hexawise: Do you have any predictions about how large an impact Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning will have on software testing in the next 5-10 years?

James: I don’t think it will have any impact on testing as such, except inasmuch as many people (not skeptical testers, but people who might otherwise hire testers) will trust black boxes when they should be challenging them.

I suppose as machine learning become more available to the masses, someone might try to train one to recognize bad output of some kind. That’s a sort of test tool. But it would only apply to well-established kinds of badness.

If you think about it, anti-spam systems are a sort of test system. Machine learning is used in spam filters. So, I guess testing is already using machine learning in that sense. But I don’t see the average tester applying machine learning methods to testing. I don’t see a developer doing that, either. It’s too involved and complicated; too narrow in application.

I hear that people at Google are going to “put coders out of business” with a system that writes code based on people just talking. You know what that’s called? A compiler. They are inventing a high level compiler. Now the people who talk will be called developers and will have to learn to talk properly, because it will emerge that normal people can’t say what they actually want.

Hexawise: Have you seen a particularly effective process where the software testing team was integrated into the feedback from a deployed software application (getting feedback from users on problems, exploring issues the software noted as possible bugs...)? What was so effective about that instance?

James: Not really. What I see is developers ignoring feedback. It’s too overwhelming. I suspect there are people who are really good at doing that. But I haven’t run across any.

One of the things that has happened with DevOps is a de-emphasis on testing and more of an emphasis on overall risk management. That’s a valid strategy, of course, but it has interesting blind spots. Whenever I hear a developer speak about wanting feedback from users I immediately think about how abusive and incompetent most users are about reporting problems. No, my developer friends, you really don’t want to read all those Internet comments on your software. You will be demoralized. But testers? We love reading that stuff. It’s our wheelhouse. We get clues and then we can reproduce the problems and make them sensible for the devs.

My brother, at eBay, with his testing mentality, loves going over the user feedback and bringing it to the teams there. But he will tell you it’s a constant struggle to get the attention of the dev teams.

attend a conference. Don’t bother to go to the talks, though. Most of the talks are full of fluff. Instead, find people and talk to them. Compare notes, make friends. Go to the testing lab.

Hexawise: Often one of the major roadblocks to software testers is their own management. Do you think this is a fair statement? Do you have suggestions for how testers can attempt to improve the situation. My background is strongly influenced by W. Edwards Deming so I have a tendency to look at the organization as a system and see room to improve the management system. It seems to me often the biggest gains are not possible if we keep departments separate (software development, software testing, marketing, customer service...). We can make improvements in software testing even if it is largely seen as separate from the organization but in doing so we miss much greater potential improvement.

James: The collapse of the test management industry is a terrible problem. It’s getting harder to find any kind of test manager out there. Do they even exist in Silicon Valley any more or have they all been hunted down by parasitic wasps who lay “scrum master” eggs in their living carcasses?

People who seem to know little about management or testing tell me that test managers are not needed. Okay, that means a whole lot of things that test managers do will not get done. This includes: providing a protected place for testers to work, free of harassment; negotiating for testability; negotiating for resources; assuring that schedules are reasonable; assuring that testing gets the respect it requires in order to attract and keep talented people; assuring that deadlines are met; explaining testing to management; assuring that testers are properly trained. When those things aren’t happening, testers tend to become more zombie-like and reactive (I’m not speaking of those fast zombies); or they become cheerleaders for the devs, instead of critical thinkers.

Staying Current / Learning

Hexawise: How do you stay current on improvements in software testing practices?

James: I’m not convinced there are improvements in testing practices in the absence of improvements in the thinking and social systems that drive practices-- and those things don’t improve much, as I’m sure you’ve noticed. Seems to me that the current nonsense in our craft is very similar to the old nonsense. Maybe some of the buzzwords have changed, but not much else.

The landscape of testing has definitely changed. Agile and Lean have aggressively colonized a lot of the testing space. Since most testers are young people (and test management has been eviscerated) they are easy pickings for the Agile Universalists (the people who think that we don’t need testers because we can just all test whenever we feel like it).

What this means is that testing remains rather primitive wherever I go (with a few interesting exceptions, driven inevitably by a single enlightened Elrond-like or Galadriel-like manager, who always seems to disappear off into the Grey Havens within a couple of years of me meeting him or her).

How I become aware of new and interesting ideas is through my community. For instance, a student told me about Karnaugh maps the other day and now I am trying to find a use for them.

Hexawise: How would you suggest testers stay current?

James: I don’t think currency is a thing in testing, except with respect to learning about certain emerging technologies and buzzwords.

The bigger thing in testing is to push us forward, which not enough testers are trying to do. Don’t worry about currency, worry about whether you truly understand testing, and keep working on that study.

Read widely about science. Get ideas from that. And play with the ideas. For instance, I read on Hacker News about 350,000 free images being released by the Metropolitan Museum of Art. I decided to experiment with turning that into a practical resource for test data. This led to playing with data wrangling and image analysis tools.

Also, attend a conference. Don’t bother to go to the talks, though. Most of the talks are full of fluff. Instead, find people and talk to them. Compare notes, make friends. Go to the testing lab. Or host a little conference. Invite testers to a small gathering where you can share experience reports.

Hexawise: What software testing-related books would you recommend should be on a tester’s bookshelf?

James:

Profile

James Bach has authored two books and consulted and presented on software testing worldwide. It is difficult to put into words how unique and insightful James is. In order to get a feel, we suggest listening to his presentations yourself and reading his excellent blog.

Some Career Highlights

Links

By: John Hunter and Justin Hunter on Mar 2, 2017

Categories: Interesting People , Software Testing, Testing Strategies, Interview, Testing Smarter with...

I read a great post by Aleksis Tulonen Brainstorming Test Ideas With Developers and wanted to share it with you.

The ideas in the post provide a very efficient way to:

  1. increase the robustness and thoroughness of testing,
  2. prioritize among different testing ideas (both from a relative importance standpoint and from a relative timing perspective)
  3. surface new testing ideas that would not otherwise be considered
  4. provide some useful risk mitigation protection against the reality that "all models are wrong; some models are useful" problem

I'd suggest also scheduling a debrief with the same testers and developers a few weeks or months after the code was deployed.

At that time take a look at photos of the pre-testing Post It notes and a list of defects that slipped past testing and ask

  1. "what extra tests would we need to have added to have found these defects?"
  2. "what specific inputs did we forget to include?",
  3. would techniques such as pairwise testing have been beneficial?
  4. what areas did we spent a lot of effort on that did not result in learning much?
  5. what lessons learned should we incorporate for next time?

The idea of delibrately examining your software development and testing practices will be familar to those using agile retrospectives. The power of continually improving the development practices used withing the organization is hard to appreciate but it is immense. The gains compound over time so the initial benefits are only a glimpse of what can be achieve by continuing to iterate and improve.

Related: Pairwise and Combinatorial Software Testing in Agile Projects - Applying Toyota Kata to Agile Retrospectives - Create a Risk-based Testing Plan With Extra Coverage on Higher Priority Areas

By: John Hunter and Justin Hunter on Dec 15, 2016

Categories: Agile, Software Testing, Testing Strategies

We are excited to announce an ongoing partnership with Datalex to improve software test efficiency and accuracy. Datalex has achieved extreme benefits in software quality assurance and speed-to-market through their use of Hexawise. Some of these benefits include:

  • Greater than 65 percent reduction in the Datalex test suite.
  • Clearer understanding of test coverage
  • Higher confidence in the thoroughness of software tests.
  • Complete and consistently formatted tests that are simple to automate

An airline company’s regression suite typically contains thousands of test cases. Hexawise is used by Datalex to optimize these test cases, leading to fewer tests as well as greater overall testing coverage. Hexawise also provides Datalex with a complete understanding of exactly what has been tested after each and every test, allowing them to make fact-based decisions about how much testing is enough on each project.

Hexawise has been fundamental in improving the way we approach our Test Design, Test Coverage and Test Execution at Datalex... My team love using Hexawise given its intuitive interface and it’s ability to provide a risk based approach to coverage which gives them more confidence during release sign-off.

Screen shot 2016 10 04 at 12.58.53 pm

Áine Sherry

Global Test Manager at Datalex

“As a senior Engineer in a highly innovative company, I find Hexawise crucial in regards to achieving excellent coverage with a fraction of the time and effort. Hexawise will also facilitate us to scale onwards and upwards as we continue to innovate and grow,“ – Dean Richardson, Software Test Engineer at Datalex.

By eliminating duplicative tests and optimizing the test coverage of each test case Hexawise provides great time savings in the test execution phase. Hexawise can generate fewer test scenarios compared to what testers would create on their own and those test cases provide more test coverage. Time savings in test execution come about simply because it takes less time to execute fewer tests.

Related: How to Pack More Coverage Into Fewer Software Tests - Large Benefits = Happy Hexawise Clients and Happy Colleagues

By: John Hunter on Nov 10, 2016

Categories: Business Case, Customer Success, Testing Case Studies

Performance testing examines how the software performs (normally "how fast") in various situations.

Performance testing does not just result in one value. You normally performance test various aspects of the software in differing conditions to learn about the overall performance characteristics. It can well be that certain changes will improve the performance results for some conditions (say a powerful laptop with a fiber connection) and greatly degrade the performance for other use cases. And often the software can be coded to attempt to provide different solutions under different conditions.

All this makes performance testing complex. But trying to over-simplify performance testing removes much of its value.

Another form of performance testing is done on sub components of a system to determine what solutions may be best. These often are server based issues. These likely don't depend on individual user conditions but can be impacted by other things. Such as under normal usage option 1 provides great performance but under larger load option 1 slows down a great deal and option 2 is better.

Focusing on these tests of sub components run the risk of sub-optimization, where optimizing individual sub-components result in a less than optimal overall performance. Performance testing sub-components is important but it is most important is testing the performance of the overall system. Performance testing should always place a priority on overall system performance and not fall into the trap of creating a system with components that perform well individually but when combined do not work well together.

Load testing, stress testing and configuration testing are all part of performance testing.

Continue reading about performance testing in the Hexawise software testing glossary.

By: John Hunter on Sep 27, 2016

Categories: User Experience, Software Testing Testing Strategies, Software Testing

Hexawise has been driven by the vison to provide software testers more effective coverage in fewer tests. The Hexawise combinatorial software testing application allows software testers to achieve both seemingly contradictory statements.

Too Many Tests

See some previous posts where we have explored how Hexawise achieves more coverage with fewer tests:

By: John Hunter on Sep 14, 2016

Categories: Hexawise test case generating tool, Hexawise

Software testing concepts help us compartmentalize the complexity that we face in testing software. Breaking the testing domain into various areas (such as usability testing, performance testing, functional testing, etc.) helps us organize and focus our efforts.

But those concepts are constructs that often have fuzzy boundries. What matters isn't where we should place certain software testing efforts. What matters is helping create software that users find worthwhile and hopeful enjoyable.

One of the frustration I have faced in using internet based software in the last few years is that it often seems to be tested without considering that some users will not have fiber connections (and might have high latency connections). I am not certain latency (combined maybe with lower bandwidth) is the issue but I have often found websites either actually physically unusable or mentally unusable (it is way too frustrating to use).

It might be the user experience I face (on the poorly performing sites) is as bad for all users, but my guess is it is a decent user experience on the fiber connections that the managers have when they decide this is an OK solution. It is a usbility issue but it is also a performance issue in my opinion.

It is certainly possible to test performance results on powerful laptops with great internet connections and get good performance results for web applications that will provide bad performance results on smart phones via wifi or less than ideal cell connections. This failure to understand the real user conditions is a significant problem and an area of testing that should be improved.

I consider this an interaction between performance testing and user-experience testing (I use "user-experience" to distinguish it from "usability testing", since I can test aspects of the user experience without users testing the software). The page may load in under 1 second on a laptop with a fiber connection but that isn't the only measure of performance. What about your users that are connecting via a wifi connection with high latency? What if the performance in that case is that it takes 8 seconds to load and your various interactive features either barely work or won't work at all given the high latency.

In some cases ignoring the performance for some users may be OK. But if you care about a system that delivers fast load times to users you need to consider the performance not just for a subset of users but consider how it performs for users overall. The extent you will prioritize various use cases will depend on your specific situation.

I have a large bias for keeping the basic experience very good for all users. If I add fancy features that are useful I do not like to accept meaningful degradation to any user's experience - graceful degradation is very important to me. That is less important to many of sites that I use, unfortunately. What priority you place on it is a decision that impacts your software development and software testing process.

Hexawise attempts to add features that are useful while at the same time paying close attention to making sure we don't make things worse for users that don't care about the new feature. Making sure the interface remains clear and easy to use is very important to us. It is also a challenge when you have powerful and fairly complex software to keep the usability high. It is very easy to slip and degrade the users experience. Sean Johnson does a great job making sure we avoid doing that.

Maintaining the responsiveness of Hexawise is a huge effort on our part given the heavy computation required in generating tests in large test case scenarios.

You also have to realize where you cannot be all things to all people. Using Hexawise on a smart phone is just not going to be a great experience. Hexawise is just not suited to that use case at all and therefore we wouldn't test such a use case.

For important performance characteristics it may well be that you should create a separate Hexawise test plan to test the performance under server different conditions (relating to latency, bandwidth and perhaps phone operating system). It could be done within a test plan it just seems to me more likely separate test plans would be more effective most of the time. It may well be that you have the primary test plan to cover many functional aspects and have a much smaller test plan just to check that several things work fine in a high latency and smart phone use case).

Within that plan you may well want to test out various parameter values for certain parameters operating system iOS Android 7 Android 6 Android 5

latency ...

Of course, what should be tested depends on the software being tested. If none of the items above matter in your case they shouldn't be used. If you are concerned about a large user base you may well be concerned about performance on various Android versions since the upgrade cycle to new versions is so slow (while most iOS users are on the latest version fairly quickly).

If latency has a big impact on performance then including a parameter on latency would be worthwhile and testing various parameter values for it could be sensible (maybe high, medium and low). And the same with testing various levels of bandwidth (again, depending on your situation).

My view is always very user focused so the way I naturally think is relating pretty much everything I do to how it impacts the end user's experience.

Related: 10 Questions to Ask When Designing Software Tests - Don’t Do What Your Users Say - Software Testers Are Test Pilots

By: John Hunter on Jul 26, 2016

Categories: User Experience, Testing Strategies, Software Testing

Usability testing is the practice of having actual users try the software. Outcomes include the data of the tasks given to the user to complete (successful completion, time to complete, etc.), comments the users make and expert evaluation of their use of the software (noticing for example that none of the users follow the intended path to complete the task, or that many users looked for a different way to complete a task but failing to find it eventually found a way to succeed).

Usability testing involves systemic evaluation of real people using the software. This can be done in a testing lab where an expert can watch the user but this is expensive. Remote monitoring (watching the screen of the user; communication via voice by the user and expert; and viewing a webcam showing the user) is also commonly used.

In these setting the user will be given specific tasks to complete and the testing expert will watch what the user does. The expert will also ask the user questions about what they found difficult and confusing (in addition to what they liked) about the software.

The concept of usability testing is to have feedback from real users. In the event you can't test with the real users of a system it is important to consider if you are fairly accuratately representing that population with your usability testers. If the users of the system of fairly unsophisticated users if you use usability testers that are very computer savy they may well not provide good feedback (as their use of the software may be very different from the actually users).

"Usability testing" does not encompass experts evaluating the software based on known usability best practices and common problems. This form of expert knowledge of wise usability practices is important but it is not considered part of "usability testing."

Find more exploration of software testing terms in the Hexawise software testing glossary.

Related: Usability Testing Demystified - Why You Only Need to Test with 5 Users (this is not a complete answer, it does provide insite into the value of quick testing to run during the development of the software) - Streamlining Usability Testing by Avoiding the Lab - Quick and Dirty Remote User Testing - 4 ways to combat usability testing avoidance

By: John Hunter on Jul 4, 2016

Categories: User Experience, User Interface, Testing Strategies, Software Testing

Recently we added the revisions feature as an enhancement to Hexawise created test plans. This allows you to easily revert to a previous test plan for whatever reason you wish. We provide a list of each revision and the date and all you have to do is click a button to revert to that version. We also give you the option to copy that plan (in case you want to view that plan, but ​also​ want to ​keep all​ the updates you have made since then).

Now when you are editing a test plan in Hexawise you will see a revisions link on the top of the screen (see image):

revisions-button

Note, revisions are available in editable test plans, the revisions link is not available in uneditable test plans (such as the sample plans). I saved an editable copy of the plan into my private plans.

In the example in this post, I am using the Hexawise sample plan "F) Flight Reservations" which you can view in your own account.

revisions-note

One of the notes in this sample plan says we should also test for whether java is enabled or not. So I added a new paramater for java and included enabled and not-enabled as paramater values.

At a later date, if we wanted to go to a previous version all we have to do is click the revisions link (see top image) and then we get a list of all the revisions:

revisions-action

Mouseover the revision we want to use and we can make a copy of that version or we can revert to the version we desire.

Versions make is very easy to get back to a previous version of your test plan. This has been quite a popular feature addition. I hope you enjoy it. We are constantly seeking to improve based on feedback from our users. If you have comments and suggestions please share them with use.

Related: My plan has a lot of constraints in it. Should I split it into separate plans? - Whaddya Mean "No Possible Value"? - Customer Delight

By: John Hunter on May 31, 2016

Categories: Hexawise, Hexawise test case generating tool, Hexawise tips

At Hexawise we aim to improve the way software is tested. Achieving that aim requires not only providing our clients with a wonderful software tool (which our customers say we’re succeeding at) but also a commitment from the users of our tool to adopt new ways of thinking about software testing.

We have written previously about our focus on the importance of the values Bill Hunter (our founder's father) to Hexawise. That has led us to constantly focus on how maximize the benefits our customers gain using Hexawise. This focus has led us to realize that our customers that take advantage of the high-touch training services and ongoing expert test design support on demand that we offer often realize unusually large benefits and roll out usage of Hexawise more quickly and broadly than our customers who acquire licenses to Hexawise and try to “get the tool and make it available to the team.”

We are now looking for someone to take on the challenge of helping our clients succeed. The principles behind our decision to put so much focus on helping our customers succeed are obvious to those that understand the thinking of Bill Hunter, W. Edwards Deming, Russel Ackoff etc. but they may seem a bit odd to others. The focus of this senior-level position really is to help our customers improve their software testing results. It isn't just a happy sounding title that has no bearing on what the job actually entails.

The person holding this position will report to the CEO and work with other executives at Hexawise who all share a commitment to delighting our customers and improving the practice of software testing.

Hexawise is an innovative SaaS firm focused on helping large companies use smarter approaches to test their enterprise software systems. Teams using Hexawise get to market faster with higher quality products. We are the world’s leading firm in our niche market and have a growing client base of highly satisfied customers. Since we launched in 2009, we have grown both revenues and profits every year. Hexawise is changing the way that large companies test software. More than 100 Fortune 500 companies and hundreds of other smaller firms use our industry leading software.

Join our journey to transform how companies test their software systems.

Hexawise office

Description: VP of Customer Success

In the Weeks Prior to a Sale Closing

  • Partner with sales representatives to conduct virtual technical presentations and demonstrations of our Hexawise test design solution.

  • Clearly explain the benefits and limitations of combinatorial test design to potential customers using language and concepts relevant to their context by drawing upon your own “been there, done that” experiences of having successfully introduced combinatorial test design methods in multiple similar situations.

  • Identify and assess business and technical requirements, and position Hexawise solutions accordingly.

Immediately Upon a New Sale Closing

  • Assess a new client’s existing testing-related processes, tools, and methods (as well as their organizational structure) in order to provide the client with customized, actionable recommendations about how they can best incorporate Hexawise.

  • Collaborate with client stakeholders to proactively identify potential barriers to successful adoption and put plans in place to mitigate / overcome such barriers.

  • Provide remote, instructor-led training sessions via webinars.

  • Provide multi-day onsite instructor-led training sessions that: cover basic software test design concepts (such as Equivalence Class Partitioning, the definition of Pairwise-Testing coverage, etc.) as well as how to use the specific features of Hexawise.

  • Include industry-specific and customer-specific customized training modules and hands-on test design exercises to help make the sessions relevant to the testers and BA’s who attend the training sessions.

  • Collaborate with new users and help them iterate, improve, and finalize their first few sets of Hexawise-generated software tests.

  • Set rollout and adoption success criteria with clients and put plans in place to help them achieve their goals.

Months After a New Sale Closing

  • Continue to engage with customers onsite and virtually to understand their needs, answer their test design questions, and help them achieve large benefits from test optimization.

  • Monitor usage statistics of Hexawise clients and proactively reach out to clients, as appropriate, to provide proactive assistance at the first sign that they might be facing any potential adoption/rollout challenges.

  • Collaborate with stakeholders and end users at our clients to identify opportunities to improve the features and capabilities of Hexawise and then collaborate with our development team to share that feedback and implement improvements.

Required Skills and Experience

We are looking for a highly-experienced combinatorial test design expert with outstanding analytical and communication skills to provide these high touch on-boarding services and partner with our sales team with prospective clients.

Education and Experience

  • Bachelor’s or technical university degree.

  • Deep experience successfully introducing combinatorial test design methods on multiple different kinds of projects to several different groups of testers.

  • Set rollout and adoption success criteria with multiple teams and put plans in place to achieve them.

  • Minimum 5 years in software testing, preferably at a IT consulting firm or large financial services firm.

Knowledge and Skills

  • Ability to present and demonstrate capabilities of the Hexawise tool, and the additional services we provides to our clients beyond our tool.
  • Exhibit excellent communication and presentation skills, including questioning techniques.
  • Demonstrate passion regarding consulting with customers.
  • Understand how IT and enterprise software is used to address the business and technical needs of customers.
  • Demonstrate hands-on level skills with relevant and/or related software technology domains.
  • Communicate the value of products and solutions in terms of financial return and impact on customer business goals.
  • Possess a solid level of industry acumen; keeping current with software testing trends and able to converse with customers at a detailed level on pertinent issues and challenges.
  • Represents Hexawise knowledgeably, based on a solid understanding of Hexawise’s business direction, portfolio and capabilities
  • Understand the competitive landscape for Hexawise and position Hexawise effectively.
  • A cover letter that describes who you are, what you've done, and why you want to join Hexawise.
  • Ability to work and learn independently and as part of a team
  • Desire to work in a fast-paced, challenging start-up environment

Why join Hexawise?

salary + bonus; medical and dental, 401(k) plans; free parking and very slick Chapel Hill office! Opportunity to experience work with a fast-growing, innovative technology company that is changing the way software is tested.

Key Benefits:

Salary: Negotiable, but minimum of $100,000 + Commissions based upon client license renewals Benefits: Health, dental included, 401k plan Travel: Average of no more than 2-3 days onsite per week Location: Chapel Hill, NC*

*Working from our offices would be highly preferable. We might consider remote working arrangements for an exceptional candidate based in the US.

Apply for the VP of Customer Success position at Hexawise.

By: John Hunter on May 12, 2016

Categories: Hexawise, Career, Software Testing, Lean, Customer Success, Agile